Category Archives: Tech

Huronia Alarm Donates In Kind to Georgian Triangle Hospice

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Huronia Alarm & Fire Security Inc. makes donation-in-kind to Hospice Georgian Triangle, Campbell House.

 Huronia Alarm & Fire Security Inc. (HAFS) recently installed and donated a security system, access control and door entry systems as well as security cameras to Hospice Georgian Triangle.  Hospice Georgian Triangle, Campbell House, is a residential palliative care residence for patients with a terminal diagnosis who are in the last stages of their life.  This organization also provides support for the families and friends of the patient and provides a home-away-from-home experience with 24/7 professional care.

Hospice Georgian Triangle’s Campbell House hospice serves residents in the communities from the Town of Blue Mountains to Collingwood, to Wasaga Beach and Clearview Township.

“Continued support for services that we feel are an integral part of our community form the basis for our corporate donations program at Huronia,” said Rob Thorburn Jr, President & CEO at HAFS.  “We have a number of relationships with similar organizations in the communities that we serve, and we believe that donating time, products and ongoing monitoring services are just some of the ways that we can help reduce the financial burden that these charitable organizations face each year.”

“The Hospice Georgian Triangle is an important part of the healthcare system in our area that often gets overlooked,” said Chris Johnson, Sales Consultant at HAFS who donated his sales commission for this project.  “When the capital campaign to build an addition on Campbell House began, I had no idea that the hospice needed to raise 50% of their yearly operating budget, in addition to the funds being raised to construct the new wing.  This organization depends on the generosity of the community to operate, and that’s part of the reason I donated my commission.”

“At the start of any capital campaign, there’s a lot of enthusiasm, but as the project nears completion we depend more and more on the support of our community partners to help our staff, volunteers, residents and visitors continue to receive the ongoing physical, emotional and spiritual care that they need to help them through coping with life-limiting illness,” said Kelly Borg, Executive Director at Hospice Georgian Triangle.  “Huronia has proven to be been one of those special community partners who is committed to working with us for the long haul.  And for that, we are truly grateful.”

Huronia Alarm & Fire Security Inc. has been in business for over 45 years and is Central Ontario’s leading provider of home and business security and monitoring services, CCTV, fire and safety, lock, key and safe products and services, home theatre, audio and video consultation and entertainment room design, as well as cabling and smart home wiring for today’s home automation requirements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Caption:  Rob Thorburn Jr. (President and Chief Executive Officer) and Chris Johnson (Sales Consultant) from Huronia Alarm & Fire Security Inc. presents Kelly Borg (Executive Director), Bruce West (Board Chair, HGT Foundation) and Janet Fairbridge (Donor Relations Coordinator) of Hospice Georgian Triangle a cheque for $19,164.80. This represents the in-kind dollar-value amount for the supply and installation of a security system and camera system and related sales commission that Huronia donated to the Campbell House palliative care residence.

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For more information contact:

Media Inquiries:  Jaclyn Jones, President at Whiting & Holmes Limited, 289-337-3662, jaclyn@whitingandholmes.com.

Specific Inquiries relating to Huronia Alarm & Fire Security Inc:   Rob Thorburn Jr., President and Chief Executive Officer at Huronia Alarm & Fire Security Inc., 705-445-4444, rthorburn@huroniaalarms.com

Specific Inquiries relating to Hospice Georgian Triangle &/or Campbell House: Kelly Borg, Executive Director at Hospice Georgian Triangle, 705-444-2555, borgk@hospicegeorgiantriangle.com

Bill 142 – The New Construction Act

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The New Construction Act

On Thursday March 29th, BCA members and local procurement partners gathered at Tangle Creek Golf Club for a presentation by WeirFoulds LLP on the new construction act. Glenn Ackerley, Partner was our keynote speaker.  He was joined by Sandra Astolfo, Partner and Chris Zaleski from the Regional Municipality of York.

The Construction Act, Bill 142, became law in Ontario on December 12th, 2017. The new Act dramatically changes the rules for construction liens, enforces requirements for prompt payment, and introduces adjudication for dispute resolution. You can access the slide deck from their presentation here.

COCA Provincial Budget Highlights

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2018 Provincial Budget Highlights

On Wednesday, March 28, 2018, Finance Minister Charles Sousa delivered the 2018/2019 Ontario Budget, titled “A Plan for Care and Opportunity”.
The consensus among the media and political pundits is that the budget is aimed at voters that have become disenchanted with the Wynne lead Liberal government.

Read the full report

The Barrie Construction Association is a proud member of COCA.

The Council of Ontario Construction Associations (COCA) is a federation of construction associations; the largest and most representative group of ICI and heavy civil construction employers in Ontario. Our member organizations represent more than 10,000 construction businesses and more than 400,000 employees.

COCA brings the concerns of our members to the attention of Queen’s Park and is committed to working with the government to ensure that Ontario’s legislative landscape is one in which our industry can grow and prosper.

Are you a Proactive Safety Leader?

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To achieve exemplary safety performance, leaders must improve their impact by adopting management strategies based on the science of behavior.

The default approach to managing safety, commonly known as “exception management” (or the safety cop approach), focuses on exceptions-what went wrong, errors, violations of procedures, and at-risk behaviors. Such a focus leads to the use of corrective feedback at best, and more negative consequences (like discipline), at worst. The science of behavior shows that over time, an overreliance on negative consequences leads to undesirable side effects such as lower morale, suppressed reporting of incidents and near misses, lower trust, and decreased engagement.
The alternative is positive safety management which focuses more on what is going well-adherence to procedures, productive safety conversations, safe behavior, and improvements. The science of behavior has proven that a greater focus on desired behavior not only strengthens desired behavior, it also leads to greater teamwork, improved trust, more open conversations about safety, and increased engagement.

Following are six tips that help leaders begin to use scientifically sound strategies for managing safety:

Build Relationships.
It’s no coincidence that leaders who have strong relationships with their direct reports tend to have better safety performance. So how are relationships built? The first step is to treat direct reports like people, not just employees. Leaders must demonstrate that they truly care about their direct reports-and in particular about their health and safety. The second step is to ask more and tell less. Leaders too often believe that because they are the “boss” they are supposed to have all the answers. By asking more than telling, leaders learn more about direct reports, leave them feeling valued and respected , and end up with more optimal safety solutions. A third key to relationships is building trust with this simple formula: do what you say you will do. While the formula is simple, following through with it is not.

Relentlessly Address Hazards.
Frontline employees gauge how truly important safety is in an organization by management’s willingness to eliminate hazards. When leaders make hazard identification and remediation a priority, frontline employees are willing to get more engaged in safety. Be sure to ask about hazards frequently, make reporting hazards easy, take personal responsibility
for hazard remediation, and communicate status frequently.

Conduct Daily Safety Interactions.
Take the time to talk to people about safety every day. Those interactions allow you to learn about hazards, address concerns, and importantly, to influence behavior. But be careful that you don’t just initiate interactions when there are problems or at-risk behaviors. Look for and recognize the safe behaviors you want more of. Remember to ask more than you tell, focus on specific behavior (not generalities), and be sincere in your interest in safety. Engaging in frequent safety interactions will strengthen critical safety behaviors, making them more consistent, and at the same time
build relationships, trust, morale, and engagement.

Respond Positively to Reporting.
Incidents and near misses provide valuable lessons about how safety is working . They uncover weaknesses in safety systems and processes that, in turn , enable changes to be made to prevent future incidents. But most leaders inadvertently discourage reporting of minor incidents and near misses by how they react. Signs of frustration, disbelief, or anger are only the start. Reporting often leads to unpleasant paperwork, in­vestigations that feel like inquisitions,and sometimes discipline for those who report. Ensure that reporting is positively reinforced by letting those who report know that the information they provide will help prevent incidents.

Focus on Prevention.
Managing safety with lagging indicators leads to a reactive approach and can be misleading. Going for long periods without an incident is no guarantee that safety is under control. Leaders need to actively manage behaviors that prevent incidents, not just react when incidents occur. By focusing your management time and effort on preventative behaviors-what you and your team
do each day to prevent incidents-you will have a much better sense of how truly safe your workplace is.

Consider Safety in Every Decision.
Organizations are interconnected systems. A change in one area inevitably has impact in other areas, often unanticipated. While it is impossible to anticipate all the ways a decision will influence safety, it is important to try. Senior leaders are always concerned about safety however; they are responsible for keeping their organizations profitable. It is easy to see how well-intended leaders
make decisions that are good for the business but end up having negative implications for safety. Be sure to think through how each decision will affect the antecedents and consequences for safe and at-risk behavior at the front line and through all levels of management.

While there is much more to learn about becoming an exemplary safety leader, these tips can start you on the path to having greater impact on safety culture and safety performance.

ADI Safety Solutions
ADI is dedicated to accelerating the safety and business performance of companies worldwide using positive, practical approached grounded in the science of behavior and engineered to ensure
long-term sustainability. Some of the areas in which we help our cl ients excel include:
• Safety Leadership
• Safety Culture
• Safety Surveys & Assessments
• Behavior-Based Safety
• Safety Training

Dr. Judy Agnew, Dr. Judy Agnew is a leading authority in the field of safety leadership, safety culture and behav­ ioral safety. She is the co-author of three highly regarded safety books, Safe By Accident: Take the Luck Out of Safety, Removing Obstacles to Safety, and A Supervisor’s Guide to (Safety) Lead­ership. She is Senior Vice President of Safety Solutions at Aubrey Daniels International (ADI), where she helps clients create behavior-based inter­ventions that lead to a company-wide culture of safety

Plant Manager – Manufacturing Position Available

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Plant Manager – Manufacturing

Ontario

Our client is seeking a Plant Manager to join their growing team. The company is located in Ontario, 75 km north of Toronto and is a manufacturing and processing facility that manufactures residential and commercial roofing products. As a family-owned company for nearly 40 years, our client has grown to be a leader in the industry, covering homes, farms and businesses across North America and Europe. They are known in the industry as having a solid reputation, built on quality and durability. Products are supplied throughout the industry in Eastern Canada, for use in residential, agricultural, and commercial facilities.
In this newly created position of Plant Manager, you will be integral to an aggressive growth plan that the company is embarking on over the next 3 to 5 years. They are seeking an ambitious, success driven individual to lead the manufacturing team. The ideal candidate will be a hands-on leader, with experience in manufacturing and/or production, motivated by organization success.

Responsibilities
The successful candidate, will be responsible for managing plant operations and integrating logistics with other aspects of the operations. Examples of specific duties include (but are not limited to):
 Manage plant performance, including optimization of production in relation to available raw materials, capacity, production plans, quality requirements and standards, including – Establishing and achieving production targets;
– Improving efficiencies and reducing costs;
– Ensure preventative maintenance plans are established and implemented;
 Lead an accomplished and experienced manufacturing and production team, while ensuring positive and proactive working relationships across all levels of the organization
 Manage plant operations, including health & safety, resource and labour utilization, continuous improvement and cost controls;
 Develop production schedules and maintain inventory; including purchasing materials when required;
 Develop equipment maintenance schedules and recommend the replacement of machines;
 Create and manage employee schedules, manage and provide clear direction to plant employees;
 Oversee employee training in the use of new equipment or production techniques;
 Adhere and develop the plant’s values, internal strategy, and leadership, through reviewing KPI’s and coaching supervisors on employee performance.
 Plan and manage the establishment of departmental budgets and ensure coordination and integration with other departments of the organization.

Requirements
 Completion of a college or university program in engineering or business administration, or demonstrated experience in a manufacturing/production environment;
 A minimum of 5 years’ of supervisory experience; and
 Drive and ambition to empower and lead a team to drive profitable organizational results

Success in this role requires a skilled operational leader who is highly motivated leader by organizational success, able to take a “hands-on” approach to work, and who is dedicated to the pursuit of excellence. You are able to implement new technologies, drive high quality, on-time production and provide insight and input to the entire organization when complex issues arise.
Demonstrating superior communication skills, you create constructive and positive dialogue with employees, suppliers, and the local community. You thrive in a team environment and have strong leadership skills, allowing you to motivate employees through your energetic and outgoing personality. The successful candidate will work closely with management to help realize financial and organization success in a cost effective manner.
Qualified applicants are asked to submit their resume along with a covering letter to Grant Thornton LLP via email at ClientApplications@ca.gt.com citing “Plant Manager Application” in the subject line, no later than March 28, 2018.
We appreciate all expressed interest in this position; however, only the candidates selected for interview will be contacted. No phone calls please.
We encourage applications from all qualified individuals, including Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, members of visible minorities and women. Members of designated groups are encourages to self-identify. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian Citizens and Permanent Residents will be given priority.